Recognizing risk factors of type 2 diabetes

CookiesThe holiday season is quickly approaching, and today we’re honoring American Diabetes Month by reflecting on the risk factors of type 2 diabetes.

Those sugary treats can take a toll on all of us during the holidays, and our favorite jolly friend, Santa Claus, is no exception, according to Molly Gee, registered dietitian at Baylor College of Medicine.

Examining real risk factors through mythical figure

Do all of those platters of cookies put Santa Claus at risk for type 2 diabetes? Here is a simple risk test to find out:

  • Age: While we don’t know his exact age, Mr. Claus is getting up there, and the older you are, the higher the risk for type 2 diabetes.
  • Gender: Male – men are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes.
  • Family History: Not known.
  • Blood Pressure: Those rosy cheeks could indicate that his blood pressure is high.
  • Physical Activity: We know he’s active during the holiday season, but it’s likely he’s sedentary the rest of the year.
  • Weight Status: Not known, but all those cookies have to go somewhere. Those who are overweight or obese have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

According to our test, Santa Claus may be at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Recognize symptoms?

Do St. Nick’s symptoms sound all too familiar to you? Check with your primary care physician to see if you might have diabetes.

Symptoms include frequent urination, excessive thirst, feeling hungry even though you are eating, extreme fatigue and blurry vision.

Participate in clinical research

If you’ve been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, consider signing up for a clinical trial at Baylor College of Medicine to study the effectiveness of new treatment options.

For those with pre-diabetes, Baylor is recruiting volunteers to take part in the first definitive, large-scale clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health to investigate if a vitamin D supplement helps prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in adults. See more information on the website.

For those newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Baylor is recruiting volunteers for the GRADE study funded by the National Institutes of Health that will compare the long-term benefits and risk of four widely used diabetes drugs in combination with metformin, the most common first-line medication for treating type 2 diabetes. See more information on the website.

-By Dipali Pathak

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2 thoughts on “Recognizing risk factors of type 2 diabetes

  1. Pingback: In case you missed it: Ghost hearts, drug-resistant antibiotics and more | Momentum - The Baylor College of Medicine Blog

  2. Pingback: Win the fight against heartburn before it starts | Momentum - The Baylor College of Medicine Blog

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