Throwback Thursday: A camel mystery

This week’s Throwback Thursday is a bit of a mystery wrapped in an enigma. It’s 1921 and Baylor University College of Medicine students are in a photograph with a camel.

At this point, your guess is as good as ours./Photo courtesy Baylor College of Medicine.

At this point, your guess is as good as ours./Photo courtesy Baylor College of Medicine Archives.

Unfortunately, the 1921 Baylor University Round Up yearbook doesn’t shed much light on the topic, or even the basic what or why. However, this is what we do know: The group pictured is the Shrine Club. And the darling fezzes bear the logo for Shriners International, specifically the Hella Shrine, which was created in 1887 in the greater Dallas region.

According to the Hella Shrine’s website, their charter was officially granted in 1888 with an inaugural 33 members. This charter initially encompassed the entire state of Texas.

So what does that have to do with medicine and why were our students involved?

While we may not know the exact correlation or how the group fit into the College, we do know Shriners International has a very real connection to medicine, especially for children. In 1922, Shriners Hospital for Children was founded to provide expert medical care for kids and eliminate the expense for their families. According to the Shriners International, the philanthropic effort thrives today with 22 hospitals in the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Regardless of the date (or type of hat), the College’s students have enjoyed a rich experience on campus inside and outside of the classroom. Today, Baylor College of Medicine boasts more than 30 diverse student organizations that relate to medicine, hobbies and much more.

Know something we don’t about our archival photos? Use the comment section below to fill us in.

By Audrey M. Marks

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s